Tag Archives: diversity

Disingenuous Diversity

I originally posted this 10 years ago and am re-running it in light of the recent Google Goolag tantrums over a completely logical and factual analysis that actually supported what Goolag claimed to want.  But that wasn’t enough for the Orwellian types who can’t tolerate any discussion of their bigoted beliefs.

Corporate Diversity organizations are a joke.  Even a Leftist photographer I know had to concede how completely and ironically uniform they are (she was doing a photo shoot of them for a magazine).  Just as in HP, they were all middle-aged black females.  The exception at HP was a black middle-aged male, but he was gay, so in a sense they were still the same.  I felt sorry for them, knowing that at some point they’d realize the company had no use for them in anything that actually contributed to the success of the company.

Check out Gab if you want a site that doesn’t censor conservative viewpoints like Goolag, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc. do.


diversity.jpgDiversity programs at businesses and schools tend to be disingenuous (lacking in frankness, candor, or sincerity) and hopelessly mired in PC-land.  It is a shame, too, because if companies used them properly they could be fabulous recruiting and retention tools.

I believe in true diversity.  The groups I have managed have always been diverse, and my current group resembles the United Nations (except that we actually get things done).

I don’t aim at politically correct diversity.  I try to hire smart, hard-working, talented, team-oriented people.  Prima donnas need not apply.  By doing that in a color-blind way, I tend to end up with a broad representation of sexes, ages, religions, races, etc.

I am quite familiar with diversity programs and the politics behind them.  I represented the Christian employee network group at Compaq / HP and experienced some interesting things.  Corporations cave to threats of boycotts by the gay groups and do little to police them.  One “Pride” group at HP had a team building event to go to a drag queen contest.  Indeed.  It was published on the company’s intranet.

Of course, free sensitivity training was offered to anyone who might not think that a company funded employee organization based on sexual preferences was a swell idea.

We had a Christian employee network group with official “diversity group” recognition when we were still just Compaq.  The Diversity Manager complimented us regularly and considered us the model network group.

After the merger with HP, they approved all the other groups immediately but scrutinized the Christian group for a full year.  We met the criteria they had published better than any other group, so they finally approved us.  But someone complained and then our charter was revoked without discussion.  The explanation we got was tortured in its logic.  They obviously didn’t want to tell us the real reason behind it. They refused to meet with us to discuss the matter, even after I wrote Carly Fiorina.

A good friend of mine ran the Asian-Indian network group, which, as you can imagine, was primarily Hindu.  The company paid every year for them to have a Diwali celebration (the Hindu Festival of Lights, a religious event) on company property on company time.  When we asked why that group could have a religious festival when all we wanted was the ability to network and communicate, the Diversity VP acknowledged that she didn’t even realize it was a religious festival.

It all worked out fine, though.  To HP’s credit they let us use the email system for prayer requests and informal communications.  Many wonderful things were accomplished with that.  We could use conference rooms for lunch time Bible studies.  In some ways it was better to be an unofficial group than an official one, because that way we didn’t look too “corporate.”

It also gave us a great witness opportunity.  I found out later that the leaders were amazed that we didn’t protest and complain like other groups did.  We didn’t agree with their decisions, but we always responded graciously and didn’t disrupt the workplace.

The “Day of Silence” and “Diversity Week” programs at businesses and schools are a joke.  They aren’t about diversity at all.  They are aggressively promoting a particular worldview – and doing so with the power of the State in the case of the schools.  If they want to champion real diversity, how about inviting people with opposing views, such as those who view homosexual behavior as immoral yet think the homosexuals themselves should be treated with kindness and dignity and protected from abuse?  Now that would be real diversity.

I really encourage you to watch these videos and check out this site.  This is going on in public schools – elementary schools – today!

Roundup

The True Story of Christian Missionaries — Yes, there have been some misguided and even bad missionaries.  But on balance — and not surprisingly — they have done great good:

Areas where Protestant missionaries had a significant presence in the past are on average more economically developed today, with comparatively better health, lower infant mortality, lower corruption, greater literacy, higher educational attainment (especially for women), and more robust membership in nongovernmental associations.

. . .Woodberry applies this result specifically to missionaries who were “conversionary Protestants,” which he defines this way: “Conversionary Protestants (1) actively attempt to persuade others of their beliefs, (2) emphasize lay vernacular Bible reading, and (3) believe that grace/faith/choice saves people, not group membership or sacraments.”

Obama’s IRS Scandal Cover-Up — This should be front page news until it is fully investigated.  The media is complicit in this cover-up. The lack of attention and outrage just makes the Left that much more brazen.  This is far worse than Watergate.

120 EXhomosexual video testimonies — Don’t believe the “born that way” lies that even the experts on the Left know aren’t true.  There is hope.

In their own unscripted words, 120 men and women from all races, ethnicities and backgrounds tell of coming out of homosexuality, lesbianism, bisexuality and transgenderism. GCM Watch is committed to bringing you the good news of God’s amazing grace and his inclusive love that reaches out to bring out those in sexual darkness.

Cultural Diversity Coordinator Ran Phone Sex and Escort Services, Keeps Job — Diversity organizations are a joke.

Homosexual and Bisexual Men Account for 75 Percent of Syphilis Cases: CDC — The real rate is probably higher, as straight women who contract it from bi men aren’t counted in these figures.  This is taught in all the “comprehensive” sex ed classes in public schools, right?  In Orwellian fashion, the CDC blames it on “homophobia.”

Linda Harvey’s ‘Maybe He’s Not Gay’ Book Hits Home Run, Catches Homo-Activist Flak — The “born that way” lie — which even pro-gay “experts” know isn’t true — is the foundation of the movement.  Without that, everything else falls apart.  With it we will also get legalized pedophilia and polygamy.

When women lust

We all know that men struggle with lust. But what about women? While it’s becoming more common to hear of women’s struggles with pornography use, many women still perceive that they have the moral high ground over men. Such comparisons don’t help because men and women often struggle in different ways.

When a beautiful woman walks in the room or flashes on a screen or billboard, all eyes are transfixed. While men might be thinking about sex, a woman might be thinking, I wonder what it would be like to have such a body? Men want the body, women want the body. They want the body that attracts everyone. Lust can be either a strong feeling of sexual desire, or a strong desire for something.

We know when a man has sinned as he takes the body he wants through indulging in pornography or visiting a prostitute. But what does it look like for a woman to act out on her lust? She cannot take the body she desires to have, so what does she do? For the most part, her sin remains hidden. Still, there are some tell-tale signs of her sin, which I will describe in the first person because I struggle with this too.

How the Nazis mandated and used evolution and Darwin in the textbooks — Truths you’ll never hear from the Darwin lobby or at your local apostate church’s celebration of Darwin’s birthday.

The Nazi regime sought to influence young people via educational programmes and youth movements. The curriculum made connections between what was taught and its social and political implications. Darwinism was explicit, and the textbooks followed suit.

Free Apologetics Bible Inserts from J. Warner Wallace

J. Warner Wallace, author of Cold Case Christianity, former detective, member of Stand to Reason, and a “one dollar apologist,” continues to supply a steady stream of helpful resources through his websiteColdCaseChristianity, his podcastblogtwitter feed, and through speaking. (He’s my first recommendation for a guest speaker at a church or event.) And here’s one of Jim’s many resources he offers at his website:Apologetics Bible Inserts. Topics include:
• Evidence for the Deity of Jesus
• Evidence for the Resurrection
• Evidence for God’s Existence
• Evidence for the Reliability of the Old Testament
• and more…
You can check out the Apologetics Bible Inserts and download them here.

Atheism and fatherlessness (or bad fathers) — what a sad correlation.  Here are just a few people who took their misery and aggressively shared it with others.  The correlation of bad/absent fathers with the radical feminists is similar.

  • Voltaire(1694–1778): This biting critic of religion, though not an atheist, strongly rejected his father and rejected his birth name of Francois-Marie Arouet.
  • David Hume(1711–76): The father of this Scottish skeptic died when Hume was only 2 years old. Hume’s biographers mention no relatives or family friends who could have served as father figures.
  • Baron d’Holbach(1723–89): This French atheist became an orphan at age 13 and lived with his uncle.
  • Ludwig Feuerbach (1804–72): At age 13, his father left his family and took up living with another woman in a different town.
  • Karl Marx(1818–83): Marx’s father, a Jew, converted to being a Lutheran under pressure — not out of any religious conviction. Marx, therefore, did not respect his father.
  • Friedrich Nietzsche(1844–1900): He was 4 when he lost his father.
  • Sigmund Freud(1856–1939): His father, Jacob, was a great disappointment to him; his father was passive and weak. Freud also mentioned that his father was a sexual pervert and that his children suffered for it.
  • Bertrand Russell(1872–1970): His father died when he was 4.
  • Albert Camus(1913–60): His father died when he was 1 year old, and in his autobiographical novel The First Man, his father is the central figure preoccupation of his work.
  • Jean-Paul Sartre(1905–80): The famous existentialist’s father died before he was born.12
  • Madeleine Murray-O’Hair (1919–95): She hated her father and even tried to kill him with a butcher knife.

Christians. The original diversity group.

Christians.  The original diversity group.

 

There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

 

Galatians 3:28

When we had a Christian employee network group at Compaq that was one of our tag lines (that was before HP came along and decided our organization was too controversial). Not sure what reminded me of that, but I still like the sentiment.

Christianity is the ultimate in diversity. Any age, race, gender, etc. can repent and believe and be saved. It doesn’t matter who your parents were. It doesn’t matter what you’ve done. It doesn’t matter who you know (uh, except Jesus). It doesn’t matter how much money you have.  It doesn’t matter how smart you are.  It doesn’t matter what social rung or caste you are in. 

Just repent and believe.

Weekly roundup

cross1.jpgNow here’s a good evangelism idea – give out CD’s with your favorite sermon(s) containing the Gospel.  CDs are cheap – what are they, like 10 cents each these days?  Burn a bunch and put ’em in your trunk.  Also check out the Pocket Testament League where you can get free Gospel of John tracts to pass out.

This seemed like a good idea at the time.  After hearing a show on Apologetics.com about Saint Augustine I figured I should read City of God.  It is a mega-classic Christian book by the most influential Christian outside of the Bible.  Just one little problemo: It is 1,091 pages.  D’oh!

Exxon ain’t so bad – at least they aren’t politically correct.  I used to work for a Fortune 50 company and they bowed down to the GLBTQ lobby.

Intellectuals lie, the powerless die – non-violence is a great route for individuals to take in most situations.  It rarely stops evil regimes.  Lots of liberal ink has been spilled without success in solving pre-war Iraq’s violence and that of Zimbabwe, Darfur, Tibet and the recently released hostages.

Know of any good “end times” blogs or websites?  Leave a comment.  Total Transformation was looking for them.  I know of some bad ones.  Seriously, I haven’t written much on that or researched it much lately.  I did do one piece on The Book of Revelation in 5 easy minutes.

If the Book of Mormon contains the “fulness of the everlasting gospel,” why doesn’t it say anything about so many important teachings such as eternal progression, celestial marriage, the Word of Wisdom, the plurality of Gods, the pre-existence of man, our mother in heaven, baptism for the dead, etc?

Click here for the answer.

Cry Out To Jesus by Third Day – I love this song.  I enjoy playing it on iTunes and strumming along with my guitar.  It makes me think of those who believe Satan’s lies and think they can’t be saved.

Disingenuous Diversity

diversity.jpgDiversity programs at businesses and schools tend to be disingenuous (lacking in frankness, candor, or sincerity) and hopelessly mired in PC-land.  It is a shame, too, because if companies used them properly they could be fabulous recruiting and retention tools.

I believe in true diversity.  The groups I have managed have always been diverse, and my current group resembles the United Nations (except that we actually get things done). 

I don’t aim at politically correct diversity.  I try to hire smart, hard-working, talented, team-oriented people.  Prima donnas need not apply.  By doing that in a color-blind way, I tend to end up with a broad representation of sexes, ages, religions, races, etc. 

I am quite familiar with diversity programs and the politics behind them.  I represented the Christian employee network group at Compaq / HP and experienced some interesting things.  Corporations cave to threats of boycotts by the gay groups and do little to police them.  One “Pride” group at HP had a team building event to go to a drag queen contest.  Indeed.  It was published on the company’s intranet.

Of course, free sensitivity training was offered to anyone who might not think that a company funded employee organization based on sexual preferences was a swell idea.

We had a Christian employee network group with official “diversity group” recognition when we were still just Compaq.  The Diversity Manager complimented us regularly and considered us the model network group.

After the merger with HP, they approved all the other groups immediately but scrutinized the Christian group for a full year.  We met the criteria they had published better than any other group, so they finally approved us.  But someone complained and then our charter was revoked without discussion.  The explanation we got was tortured in its logic.  They obviously didn’t want to tell us the real reason behind it. They refused to meet with us to discuss the matter, even after I wrote Carly Fiorina. 

A good friend of mine ran the Asian-Indian network group, which, as you can imagine, was primarily Hindu.  The company paid every year for them to have a Diwali celebration (the Hindu Festival of Lights, a religious event) on company property on company time.  When we asked why that group could have a religious festival when all we wanted was the ability to network and communicate, the Diversity VP acknowledged that she didn’t even realize it was a religious festival. 

It all worked out fine, though.  To HP’s credit they let us use the email system for prayer requests and informal communications.  Many wonderful things were accomplished with that.  We could use conference rooms for lunch time Bible studies.  In some ways it was better to be an unofficial group than an official one, because that way we didn’t look too “corporate.” 

It also gave us a great witness opportunity.  I found out later that the leaders were amazed that we didn’t protest and complain like other groups did.  We didn’t agree with their decisions, but we always responded graciously and didn’t disrupt the workplace. 

The “Day of Silence” and “Diversity Week” programs at businesses and schools are a joke.  They aren’t about diversity at all.  They are aggressively promoting a particular worldview – and doing so with the power of the State in the case of the schools.  If they want to champion real diversity, how about inviting people with opposing views, such as those who view homosexual behavior as immoral yet think the homosexuals themselves should be treated with kindness and dignity and protected from abuse?  Now that would be real diversity.

I really encourage you to watch these videos and check out this site.  This is going on in public schools – elementary schools – today!